Fractured Magic by Emily Bybee – #BOOKFAVORITE #AMREADING

Genre: YA Paranormal Romance


Release Date: October 31st 2018


Wild Rose Press



Summary

As the world’s worst witch, Maddie is mistreated by her own kind. She was born a Defect. Most of her spells blow up in her face, literally. While witches search for the long-lost power of the earth, Maddie spends her time in the science lab. There, she discovers a clue to the lost power. The only other witness is Jax, a smokin’ hot college bad-boy, who Maddie can’t decide if she wants to kiss or kill.

When she fails her magic final, the council orders her magic stripped. Maddie’s only chance to keep her brain intact is to find the power with the hope that it can fix her. Jax is her one true ally on the journey. The two of them must use their smarts to stay ahead of the witches while they follow a two-hundred-year-old trail to the power of the earth and the truth behind Maddie’s defect.

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About the Author


Emily grew up loving to read and escape into stories. She began writing her own at the age of twelve. In college she focused on science and graduated with a degree in Environmental Biology. After college she began writing again but quickly realized she had failed to take a single writing or grammar class. Luckily, she’s a quick learner. Emily now lives in Colorado with her wonderful husband, three amazing children, and way too many animals. She still enjoys making up stories and can’t seem to leave out the paranormal elements because they are just too much fun.

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Teasers and excerpts:

The goons grabbed Jax and half dragged his weak body across the room.

“No,” I screamed, and lunged toward him. My gaze met his and held. “Jax, I don’t care about the secret. You matter, you’re the only thing that matters to me.”

He disappeared through the doorway, and I fell to my hands and knees.

His face reddened. “You’ll be fine? Your heart stopped six times. You were dead, Maddie, for nearly ten minutes. You were dead.”

I waved off his concern. “Well, I’m back now so cancel the funeral.”

Jax grabbed my arm. “Do something.”

The strain in his voice pierced me like daggers. He didn’t deserve this. I just shook my head. “It’s no use.”

“But you’re a witch,” he insisted. “Use your powers.”

I yanked my arm away unable to meet his eyes. “The only thing my powers are good for is…” My eyes stared through the metal mesh at our feet and rested on the support pillars. “Blowing stuff up.”

I pivoted back to look at my aunt, now thirty feet from us.

Blowing stuff up.

I may not be able to attack them directly but I could certainly rock their world. Two sets of support pillars stood in the sections that separated my aunt from us.

My hand gripped Alex’s arm. “Alex, get behind me. Now.”

His brow wrinkled. “Maddie, you can’t use your magic. You might—”

“Shut up. I have a plan,” I almost shouted. I’d been made perfectly aware of my limitations my entire life. I didn’t need him to remind me.

“Maddie, don’t try anything. You’ll kill us all.” He glanced down at the ground, so far below our feet.

Jax stepped in front of me. “Shut up, Surfer Boy. She’s smarter than you think.”

I ignored Alex’s protest and Jax’s support and channeled my energy. I focused on the y-shaped support beams where they met in the middle.

Metal was obviously harder to blow up than fruit, but my channeled energy turned the beam a molten red. For the first time in my life I fully opened the channels in my mind. Raw power disrupted the bonds of the atoms in the beam.

Before my aunt could react, the metal exploded

with the force of C-4.

I walked out on to the porch, hot dog in hand, just

in time to see Sparky float over the fence. With a final

yip he spun through the air. His body shrank as it spun,

a white blur of fur growing smaller and smaller until the

spinning stopped and a white kitten sank into Parker’s

outstretched palm.

“Meow.”

Parker grinned and rubbed Sparky the cat’s soft

fur.

“Parker,” I said in my best imitation of our

mother’s angry voice. “Mom specifically told you not

to use magic on the dog anymore. And you’re never

supposed to do it outside.”

He met my eyes and beamed. “No, she told me not

to transport him to Alaska anymore. She didn’t say

anything about transforming him.” He held the little

fluff ball out to me. “Besides isn’t he way cuter this

way?”

I couldn’t resist the big blue eyes and velvety fur. I

stroked the kitten, who let out a soft and bewildered

mew. “Okay, maybe he is a ton cuter. But you have to

change him back before Mom and Dad get home.”

He took a seat with his buddies, not a care in the

world. Call it my sense of injustice or whatever, but I

couldn’t stand to watch him sit and relax with a smile

on his face.

My parents never let me perform magic in public.

For obvious reasons. News stories tended to follow

about suspected terrorist attacks, but really, that was

only like once. Or twice.

My muscles tensed to get up and walk over to do

something mundane like throw coffee in his face. I

know, being a witch should be way cooler. But I had to

do something.

Before I could stand up, the tiny lights of my blood

cells flashed in my mind. I paused, I already had to

have an uncomfortable talk with my parents about the

burning blood. What was one more tiny problem?

I settled back into my seat. Across the room

Nathan laughed and lifted his cup to blow on the

steaming drink. I focused my aim, carefully using only

a little of my energy to undo the electromagnetic bonds

of the molecules in his cup.

It took all my attention. I’d only managed success

with this particular spell a couple times and if my aim

was the least bit off…Well, let’s just say it wouldn’t be

pretty.

The bottom of Nathan’s cup blew out, and the

contents covered his crotch in mocha napalm. My

excess energy had superheated the coffee to a scalding

temperature and sent chunks of the cup flying through

the air. He sprang from his seat and fanned his pants

while his wide-open mouth emitted a surprisingly high

pitched shriek.

My hand slapped over my lips, my entire body

shaking with enjoyment. A little overkill, maybe. Too

bad my mom wasn’t around to see me actually do a

spell right.

I pricked my finger and got the slide ready.

He dropped the solution on my blood, and we

waited for the cells to start bursting. Nothing happened.

Several beats passed. I glanced up to meet Jax’s

confused look. Unsure what to say, I turned back to the

microscope. Tiny lights began to appear inside each

blood cell. In a matter of seconds, they glowed like

miniscule stars flying through the solution. The light

intensified, glaring out of the tiny cells.

“What the hell?” Jax asked.

I couldn’t take my eyes off the blood. Finally, I

straightened, tears running down my face from the

blinding light. I met his wide-eyed gaze over the top of

the gleaming scope. The slide cast pink light up to the

ceiling, leaving the room in a rosy glow.

“How?” he stammered.

I opened my mouth without a clue as to what to tell

Jax. A loud pop saved me the trouble. Smoke curled up

from the cracked slide as the light faded. A nasty

burned-meat smell wafted up to my nostrils. Only one

thought made it through the frozen neurons in my brain.

Get out of here.